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IRA

The Earliest Age You Can Withdraw Retirement Money Without Penalty

Do you know what is the earliest age you can be and still be eligible to withdraw money from a deferred retirement account without penalty?

Where To Establish Your IRA Account

There are many institutions where you can establish your IRA account. This article reviews the pros and cons of the main options.

Higher Education Expenses Paid From an IRA

An IRA can be used to pay for higher education expenses. This avoids the penalty for early withdrawal that occurs if you’re under age 59 1/2.

Traditional IRA v. Roth IRA – Compare & Contrast

What are the differences and similarities between traditional IRA and Roth IRA? This article gives you the basics in a comparison and contrast.

Calculating your Required Minimum Distribution

Learn how to calculate your required minimum distribution for your IRA, 401k, 403b or other qualified retirement plan.

Adjusting Withholding Saved 44% of the Tax Bill

Adjusting withholding on your income taxes can produce some surprising results. See how one taxpayer saved 44% in taxes by adjusting his withholding.

Tax Impacts of Early Withdrawals from Your IRA

When you make early withdrawals from an IRA or other retirement plan there are tax ramifications, depending on the circumstances of your withdrawal.

Rollover Risk

The idea of an IRA rollover, or a rollover IRA, isn’t necessarily a cosmic mystery – this happens all the time.  You leave your job, and you rollover your 401(k) to an IRA.  No problem, right?  Unfortunately, there often are problems with the process of moving funds from one account to another – because there are a couple of very restrictive rules regarding how this process can and cannot be done.  It’s not terribly complex, but you’d be surprised how easily these rules can trip you up. Rollover Risk Let’s start with a few definitions: A Rollover is when you take a distribution from one qualified plan or IRA custodian, in the form of a check made out to you, and then you re-deposit that check into another qualified plan or IRA account (at a different custodian). A Trustee-to-Trustee Transfer (TTT), even though it is often referred to as a […]

How to Make Your Saving Automatic

Sometimes it can be difficult to save for emergencies or for retirement. While physically not demanding, the mental strain can be a hump that is hard to get over. In other words, we experience a little bit of “pain” or mental anguish if we have to physically hand over money or write a check. So how can we overcome this anguish? Automate. First, determine how much you need for an emergency. This can either be to start the fund or to replenish amounts that have been used. Generally, it’s a good idea to have 3 to 6 months of non-discretionary expenses (expenses that don’t go away if you lose your job or become disabled) set aside in an FDIC insured bank account. Some individuals may find it more comforting to have 6 to 9 months or 9 to 12 months. It’s up to you. For retirement, I recommend saving 15 […]

6 Year End Tips for a Financially Productive 2017

As 2016 comes to a close in a few weeks and we start into 2017, here are some good tips to consider to start 2017 off with some good strategies that will hopefully become habits. If you’re not doing so already, set up your payroll deductions to save the maximum to your 401k. There’s plenty of time to your payroll allocated so your deductions start coming out on the first paycheck in January. The 2017 maximum contributions are $18,000 for those under age 50 and $24,000 for those age 50 or older. To deduct the max, simply take the number of pay periods you have annually and divide it into your maximum contribution amount. This will allow you to save the maximum amount over 2017. Consider doing the same to maximize your IRA contribution. Those limits are $5,500 (under 50) and $6,500 (over 50) respectively. Check your allowances on your […]

Penalties for Changing SOSEPP

What are the penalties for changing your SOSEPP? If you don’t know, that’s another name for a 72t distribution. IRS has some severe penalties if you change your payment plan.

Tax-Loss Harvesting: It’s Never Too Late

Tax-loss harvesting is a tax move that can help with your income tax burden when you’ve experienced a loss with your investments.  Briefly, this is where you have a taxable account, holding stocks, bonds, or mutual funds and the market declines leaving your holdings in a loss situation.  Once you sell the holding, you have realized the loss, which enables you to take advantage of the tax laws and deduct those losses, first against any gains in your account(s), and then at a rate of $3,000 per year against ordinary income. This is similar to the famous move that Mr. Trump (and I would be shocked if Mrs. Clinton never took a loss against future taxes) used to avoid future income taxes. This was recently discovered in Trump’s tax records and made out to be a fatcat loophole – at least by the media – when actually anyone can take advantage of […]

SOSEPP & How a QDRO Affects It

In addition to the 72(t) exception available for folks with a QDRO (see this post), there is also the question of how a QDRO impacts an established Series of Substantially Equal Periodic Payments (SOSEPP) – which, as we know, once established can only be changed one time. Although not definitive, below are summaries of three Private Letter Rulings (PLRs) that seem to suggest first of all that making the distribution is not subject to the 10% penalty when a QDRO or divorce decree is involved, pursuant to the regulation in Code section 72(t)(4)(A)(ii). Private Letter Rulings for SOSEPP 1) The transfer to a taxpayer’s spouse pursuant to a divorce decree of 50% of each of three separate IRAs owned by the taxpayer from which the taxpayer had already begun receiving “substantially equal periodic payments” did not result in a modification where the taxpayer’s spouse was two years younger and would commence […]

401(k) & Qualified Domestic Relations Orders (QDRO)

An exception to the 10% penalty on distributions from a qualified plan (but not an IRA, an IRA is split via a transfer incident to a divorce, which is not an automatic exception) Qualified Domestic Relations Order, or QDRO (cue-DRO).  A QDRO is often put into place as part of a divorce settlement, especially when one spouse has a qualified retirement plan that is a significant asset. What happens in the case of a QDRO is that the court determines what amount (usually a percentage, although it could be a specific dollar amount) of the qualified retirement plan’s balance is to be presented to the non-owning spouse.  Once that amount is determined and finalized by the court, a QDRO is drafted and provided to the non-owning spouse. This document allows the non-owning spouse to direct the retirement plan custodian to distribute the funds in the amount specified. In the case of a QDRO, the owning spouse will […]

Missed Rollover Automatic Waivers

When you rollover funds from one retirement plan to another, a missed rollover occurs if you can’t complete the rollover within 60 days. A missed rollover results in a taxable distribution. However, there have always been certain specific situations that provide for exceptions to this rule, but any reasons outside that limited list required the taxpayer to request a Private Letter Ruling (PLR) from the IRS. The PLR request process could result in some significant costs for lawyers and fees. Rev Proc 2016-47: Missed Rollover Waivers Recently the IRS published a new procedure for handling an expanded list of exceptions for a missed rollover. This procedure, Rev. Proc. 2016-47, outlines eleven possible exceptions to the missed rollover rule. The eleven exceptions are: an error was committed by the financial institution receiving the contribution or making the distribution to which the contribution relates; the distribution, having been made in the form of a check, was […]

Withdrawals from an IRA – death, disability, and 59 1/2

Three of the most common ways that you can withdraw funds from your IRA without penalty are: 1) reaching age 59½; 2) death; and 3) disability. Below is a brief review of each of these conditions for penalty-free withdrawal: Reaching Age 59½ When you reach age 59½, you can withdraw any amount from your IRA without penalty, for any reason. The only thing you have to remember is that you must pay ordinary income tax on the amount that you withdraw. This means that, once you have reached the date that is 6 months past your 59th birthday, you are free to make withdrawals from your IRA without penalty. You are not required to take distributions at this age (that happens at age 70½). Death Upon your death at any age, the beneficiaries of your account or your estate if you have not named a beneficiary, can take distributions from your IRA in […]

RMD from an Inherited IRA

If you have inherited an IRA you are required to begin taking distributions from the account according to a set schedule. If you are the sole beneficiary of the IRA, how you handle your distributions is up to you. If there are two or more beneficiaries of the IRA, the process becomes more complicated – see the article at the link for more on multiple beneficiary arrangements. There are actually two different schedules that you can use, lifetime distributions and a distribution over 5 years. 5-year distribution The 5-year distribution method is the default period for distribution of an inherited IRA. As the name of the method suggests, in this method the inherited IRA must be completely withdrawn within 5 years of the death of the original owner. There is no specific amount that must be withdrawn in any particular year, as long as the entire account is withdrawn within […]

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